Cerebral edema sources

Information sourced in part from the Canadian Cancer Society


Disclaimer: There is no shortage of web-based online medical diagnostic tools, self-help or support groups, or sites that make unsubstantiated claims around diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Please note these sources may not be evidence-based, regulated or moderated properly and it is encouraged individuals seek advice and recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment and symptom management from a regulated healthcare professional such as a physician or nurse practitioner. Individuals should be cautioned about sites that make any of the following statements or claims that:

  • The product or service promises a quick fix
  • Sound too good to be true
  • Are dramatic or sweeping and are not supported by reputable medical and scientific organizations.
  • Use of terminology such as “research is currently underway” or “preliminary research results” which indicate there is no current research.
  • The results or recommendations of product or treatment are based on a single or small number of case studies and has not been peer-reviewed by external experts
  • Use of testimonials from celebrities or previous clients/patients that are anecdotal and not evidence-based 

Always proceed with caution and with the advice of your medical team. 

Aneurysm sources

Information for this page sourced in part from The Brain Aneurysm Foundation. You can find more information on their website at this link.


Disclaimer: There is no shortage of web-based online medical diagnostic tools, self-help or support groups, or sites that make unsubstantiated claims around diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Please note these sources may not be evidence-based, regulated or moderated properly and it is encouraged individuals seek advice and recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment and symptom management from a regulated healthcare professional such as a physician or nurse practitioner. Individuals should be cautioned about sites that make any of the following statements or claims that:

  • The product or service promises a quick fix
  • Sound too good to be true
  • Are dramatic or sweeping and are not supported by reputable medical and scientific organizations.
  • Use of terminology such as “research is currently underway” or “preliminary research results” which indicate there is no current research.
  • The results or recommendations of product or treatment are based on a single or small number of case studies and has not been peer-reviewed by external experts
  • Use of testimonials from celebrities or previous clients/patients that are anecdotal and not evidence-based 

Always proceed with caution and with the advice of your medical team. 

Fatigue sources

[1] msktc.org

[2] Mollayeva, T., Kendzerska, T., Mollayeva, S., Shapiro, C. M., Colantonio, A., & Cassidy, J. D. (2014). A systematic review of fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury: The course, predictors and consequences. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 47, 684-716. doi:10.1016/j.neubiorev.2014.10.024

[3] Synapse

[4] Headway

[5] Orff, H. J., Ayalon, L., & Drummond, S. P. (2009). Traumatic Brain Injury and Sleep Disturbance. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 24(3), 155-165. doi:10.1097/htr.0b013e3181a0b281 and;

Ponsford, J. L., Ziino, C., Parcell, D. L., Shekleton, J. A., Roper, M., Redman, J. R., . . . Rajaratnam, S. M. (2012). Fatigue and Sleep Disturbance Following Traumatic Brain Injury—Their Nature, Causes, and Potential Treatments. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 27(3), 224-233. doi:10.1097/htr.0b013e31824ee1a8

[6] msktc.org

[7] Fava & Targum, (2011). Fatigue as a Residual Symptom of Depression. Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience, 8(10): 40-43.

[8] Canadian Mental Health Association

Strategies for managing fatigue sources

[1] Headway

[2] Lindén, A., Lexell, J., & Lund, M. L. (2010). Improvements of task performance in daily life after acquired brain injury using commonly available everyday technology. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 6(3), 214-224. doi:10.3109/17483107.2010.528142

Caregiver fatigue sources

[1] Synapse

[2] Canadian Mental Health Association

[3] msktc.org

[4] Fava & Targum, (2011). Fatigue as a Residual Symptom of Depression. Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience, 8(10): 40-43.

[5] Synapse

Brain info sources

Information for this page provided in part by Ontario Brain Injury Association and My Health Alberta.


Disclaimer: There is no shortage of web-based online medical diagnostic tools, self-help or support groups, or sites that make unsubstantiated claims around diagnosis, treatment and recovery. Please note these sources may not be evidence-based, regulated or moderated properly and it is encouraged individuals seek advice and recommendations regarding diagnosis, treatment and symptom management from a regulated healthcare professional such as a physician or nurse practitioner. Individuals should be cautioned about sites that make any of the following statements or claims that:

  • The product or service promises a quick fix
  • Sound too good to be true
  • Are dramatic or sweeping and are not supported by reputable medical and scientific organizations.
  • Use of terminology such as “research is currently underway” or “preliminary research results” which indicate there is no current research.
  • The results or recommendations of product or treatment are based on a single or small number of case studies and has not been peer-reviewed by external experts
  • Use of testimonials from celebrities or previous clients/patients that are anecdotal and not evidence-based 

Always proceed with caution and with the advice of your medical team.